David E. Weekly

CEO of Medcorder, Product Executive, Angel Investor, Dad.

The Invisible Orchestra

sponsored by Audio Explosion It was a grand event when Edison first managed to reproduce his own voice by scratching grooves on a wax cylinder: in the same way that writing freed words from speech and let thoughts be transmitted over boundaries of space and time, recorded music freed sound to reach people thousands of miles away or decades to the future. However, we should note that the full potential

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The Stanford Linux Revolt

At Stanford, there’s a Technology Career Fair that pops up at least once a year. The idea is that students will hustle down there with their resumes and companies and students will smell each other out for good matches. We knew that Microsoft would be coming to the career fair, and we thought it would be great to show a little resistance. So on Friday, the day before the fair, two of us (Nathan Schmidt

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Very Solid Audio

sponsored by Audio Explosion The Japan-based Kobe Steel has apparently entered into a licensing agreement with NTT (Nippon Telephone & Telegraph, basically Japan’s AT&T) for rights to use the TwinVQ codec in a portable digital audio player called “SolidAudio.” TwinVQ, also known by its file extension .VQF, was developed separately from MP3 technology. This is in contrast to AAC, which extends MP3 technology. While AAC has a small technical edge over TwinVQ, both sound distinctively better than

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Thoughts On Efficiency

[a story for you] As Tzu-Gung was traveling through the regions north of the river Han, he saw an old man working in his vegetable garden. He had dug an irrigation ditch. The man would descend into a well, fetch up a vessel of water in his arms and pour it out into a ditch. While his efforts were tremendous the results appeared to be very meager. Tzu-Gung said, “There is a way whereby you can irrigate

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Teleacoustics: The Regulation of Transmitted Speech

For the last century, the Western world has been in possession of two technologies created for the primary purpose of transmitting speech over a distance: the telephone and the radio. While both deal with the transmission of audio, they differ significantly in how their content is regulated and who is allowed to transmit information over the medium, partly due to each media’s respective nature and how the government organizes access to

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Sharing & The Internet

The Internet is about sharing. Designed to prevent even nuclear bombs from inhibiting its never ending ebb of data, it is the most unstoppable, pervasive, and subversive medium for sharing information that the world has ever seen. From this central point we may examine three corollaries: one, that everyone should be allowed access to the Internet with a reasonable connection; two, that people should be allowed to say and hear what they want; three, that people should be allowed to either protect or openly share their intellectual property.

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Diamond Rio Review

Wednesday afternoon, I came home to a wonderful sight: a slender, foot-long cardboard rectangle sitting in front of my door, addressed from Diamond Multimedia. I walked to my friend’s room and smiled. “I know what this is,” I exclaimed, showing the box to him. Unimpressed by the box and unsure of its contents, he handed me a pair of scissors. I shortly thereafter held triumphantly the result of two weeks of

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MP3 Summit Report

NOTICE This writeup of the conference is highly opinionated. I represent myself only and am in no way affiliated with MP3.COM, even if I think they’re cool. =) I also missed a few demos and one of the panels in process of talking to some folks — my apologies to those of you that I left out. Also, because I’m a moron who forgets everything and didn’t take notes, I probably left out big chunks of speeches, missed big

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The Knee Jerk

This month, the very fundamentals of the First Amendment are held in question. On February 1, 1996, a revision to the Telecommunications Reform Act (S.652) was passed by Congress. A week later, President Clinton signed it into law. Part of the revision of the Telecommunications Act of 1996 included new rules for decency on the Internet. This section was entitled “The Communications Decency Act,” or the CDA for short. The CDA’s proponents wanted to address a key issue about the Internet: the ability of children to access indecent and pornographic material.

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Seat 11-C

The girl sitting across from me on the flight back to school somehow reminded me of a million things from back home. Her tight, determined lips instantly brought back memories of Noelle and the party. She had khakis on. This is important to me, but I’m not quite sure why. The thick, brown eyebrows brought back brief memories of the Meehan clan and Berea. Eyes may say a lot about a person’s soul, but eyebrows seem to me to express sexuality.

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